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Friday 22 June 2018
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Akufo Addo gets 62 percent approval rating

Voters looking forward to another Mahama-Akufo Addo contest in 2020

By Anthony Opara

 

One year into his four year presidency, Ghanaian President, Nana Akufo-Addo has a 62 percent approval rating as per his handling of the affairs of government in the West African nation.

This is the outcome of a survey conducted by the Political Science Department of the University of Ghana.

Specific policy initiatives that contributed to the total score included the Free Senior High School [SHS] programme, which was endorsed by 49 percent of the 5000 respondents polled, the government’s fight against illegal mining, which secured the nod of 37% of respondents and the introduction of the Office of the Special Prosecutors Bill, which is being backed by 64% of Ghanaians according to the survey outcome.

Nana Akufo Addo

Another reported bright side in the overall process is the National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS), which respondents reportedly say has “seen some revival.”

In a related development, the Industrial Commercial Workers’ Union (ICU) has scored the Nana Addo government 80% in its own assessment. However, the union also went on to harp on the need for the administration to speed up processes to get the Special Prosecutor Office running effectively.

On the flip side, the Political Students survey also reveals that 58% of voters presently believe that former President John Dramani Mahama, will very likely lead the opposition National Democratic Congress (NDC) in the 2020 elections.

John Mahama

Though he is yet to affirm any specific interest in this regard, should this prospect be activated and Akufo Addo similarly get the nod of the NPP to fly its flag again, it will then be the third time that Mahama and Akufo-Addo will be competing against each other for the Ghanaian presidency.

Analysts say that competitive elections have arguably helped to boost the democratic climate in the former Gold Coast which has now enjoyed some  26 years of uninterrupted democratic practice.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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